A wide number of factors can contribute to a need to relocate. Career advancement, remarriage, or even a shaky local economy can prompt the desire to move to a more optimal place to raise a family. But how does this work with child visitation agreements? That’s a valid concern and exactly why a competent family law attorney should be standing by your side through this process.

What Effect Does Relocation Have On Child Custody Arrangements?

This is a question many people have. Each case is unique and the court has to evaluate all sides in order to determine what is in the best interest of the child or children involved. Frequent and ongoing visitation is important to maintain a strong relationship between the child(ren) and the non-custodial parent. That is a well-known truth. This fact must be weighed against the potential benefits to the child(ren) if the custodial parent can show that moving will likely prove positive for the child(ren)’s well-being.

Why Do I Need An Attorney To See My Family Through A Relocation After Divorce?

Many sides go into determining what the best outcome is for the child(ren) in each individual case. Facts like the reason for the request to relocate, the strength of each parent’s relationship with said child(ren), financial and educational implications for both sides, and the ability of the non-custodial parent to continue visitation despite the distance to sustain a strong parent/child relationship are all things the court will need to consider before making a ruling.

Cases like these can be complex and feel overwhelming. With a capable Staten Island family law attorney, parents can rest easy knowing they are not only receiving excellent representation, but someone with their best interest at heart. We value our clients and pour our heart and soul into every case. When you trust us here at Soren Law, you can be assured we’ll go above and beyond for you and your family each and every time.

Contact us today at 718-815-4500 if you need help navigating the oftentimes rocky road of relocation after divorce.